IFAB puts offside and GLT on the agenda

Amongst the items on the agenda, the IFAB will discuss a clarification to the interpretation of Law 11 – Offside, following proposals developed by FIFA’s Refereeing department and the IFAB technical sub-committee. The technical sub-committee is comprised of the respective Heads of Refereeing and/or technical experts of FIFA and the four British Associations.

IFAB has evaluated the current definition of the offside variant “interfering with an opponent” as too unprecise and not allowing a consistent interpretation.
Concretely, the lawmakers propose the following change:
Current Definition
Proposed Definition
In the context of Law 11 – Offside, the following definitions apply:
(…)
– “interfering with play” means playing or touching the ball passed or touched by a team-mate
– “interfering with an opponent” means preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or movements or making a gesture or movement which, in the opinion of the referee, deceives or distracts an opponent
– “gaining an advantage by being in that position” means playing a ball that rebounds to him off a goalpost or the crossbar having been in an offside position or playing a ball that rebounds to him off an opponent having been in an offside position

In the context of Law 11 – Offside, the following definitions apply:
(…)
– “interfering with play” means playing or touching the ball passed or touched by a team-mate
– “interfering with an opponent” means preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or challenging an opponent for the ball.
– “gaining an advantage by being in that position” means playing a ball
(i) that rebounds or is deflected to him off the goalpost, crossbar or an opponent having been in an offside position
(ii) that rebounds, deflected or is played to him from a deliberate save by an opponent having been in an offside position.
A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent, who deliberately plays the ball (except from a deliberate save), is not considered to have gained an advantage.
Other topics for discussion include the usage of electronic performance monitoring systems; the Dropped Ball (Law 8 – Start and Restart of Play) following a submission by the Danish FA; as well as an update report on Goal-Line Technology following the implementation of two systems at the FIFA Club World Cup in Japan in December 2012. The IFAB will also discuss its future consultation and decision-making processes, as well as its future structure.
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SRC on site

Members of the State Referee Committee will be present at The Crowne Plaza in Warwick on February 9, 2013 beginning at 8:00 am. Any referee or coordinator with questions regarding registration for 2013 are welcome to attend. Referee badges for 2013 will be available as well as Inaria referee uniforms for sale. Payments will be accepted for registration by cash, check or credit card.

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Follow us on Twitter

You can now follow the RI State Referee Committee @RIReferees for the latest information on clinics and referee news

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SRC on site

Members of the State Referee Committee will be present at Smithfield High School on January 29, 2013 beginning at 5:30 pm. Any referee or coordinator with questions regarding registration for 2013 are welcome to attend. Referee badges for 2013 will be available as well as Inaria referee uniforms for sale. Payments will be accepted for registration by cash, check or credit card.

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Girls vs. Boys: Should they be refereed differently?

By Randy Vogt

A decade ago at the Long Island Junior Soccer League Convention, there were two panel discussions on whether there are any differences between girls and boys in youth sports. Successful youth soccer coaches spoke about the profound differences in coaching girls and boys, particularly that criticism of girls in particular need not go overboard as females tend to take criticism quite personally.

A few hours later, successful youth soccer referees had a separate panel discussion about whether there are any differences between officiating girls and boys. The overwhelming response was no. After all, whether girls or boys are playing soccer, the ball is round, the field is the same size and the rules are the same.

Which makes sense, although I disagree as there are real differences when refereeing the different genders. On the youth soccer level, I don’t believe there are any differences with the youngest players. The differences start to emerge at puberty.

Among females, there can be much more of an emotional connection to their teammates and to the social aspects of soccer. Females tend to consider a hard foul against a teammate as an attack against their entire team. And while males might retaliate quickly, females have long memories regarding rough fouls. A rough challenge with girls or women playing could come out of nowhere during what was a calm game but it could be retaliation for an incident even a couple of years before. I have seen this occur several times over the years.

I was even refereeing a futsal game and near the end of the game, one team was leading, 3-0. The losing team scored in the last minute and there was a great deal of celebration among teammates with a lot of players exchanging high fives. How odd since that team lost 3-1 when the final whistle blew a few seconds later.

When I asked the coach of the losing team why his team enthusiastically celebrated what appeared to be a meaningless goal (at least to the outcome of the game), he responded that they had played their opponent once before and his players thought the other team’s goalkeeper had acted like a jerk in that game. So they desperately did not want to be shut out by her.

This futsal league is very interesting as I referee the same squads on a weekly basis, unlike outdoor soccer, where I might see the same teams once or twice a year. So I get to know the tendencies of the futsal players. Among the boys, it will be that No. 10 blue is very sporting, No. 20 on green commits off-the-ball fouls and the red team’s GK gets frustrated when he gives up goals and tries to take it out on his teammates and the refs. Among the girls, I’ll need to be more aware of the interactions between players, such as the green and blue teams don’t like No. 9 red or that the yellow and purple teams really get along well with one another.

There is a perception among some refs that females do not commit violent fouls against one another. So what would be a red card when males are playing is often just a foul with no card (not even a yellow) for the same foul when females are playing. Yet girls and women deliberately foul opponents, sometimes even violently.

We saw graphic evidence of that in that 2009 NCAA women’s playoff game between the University of New Mexico and Brigham Young. The first reaction to that video was “How could a young woman do that?” with the second reaction being “Why did the refs allow it?” If a man committed the same kinds of fouls, the video would not have been nearly as newsworthy and the main reaction would have simply been “Why did the refs allow it?”

Unfortunately, there are too many referees even today who do not take officiating females as seriously as when they officiate males. If you do not take any game seriously, do not be surprised if you wind up with a game control issue that most likely could have been prevented if you had been working hard.

(Randy Vogt has officiated over 8,000 games during the past three decades, from professional matches in front of thousands to 6-year-olds being cheered on by very enthusiastic parents. In his book, “Preventive Officiating” he shares his wisdom gleaned from thousands of games and hundreds of clinics to help referees not only survive but thrive on the soccer field. You can visit the book’s website at preventiveofficiating.com/.)

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Rhode Island PRO Clinic & Annual Meeting — March 23

This year’s instructor for the upgrade and bridge clinics will be Barry Towbin of New Jersey. In his 30+ year referee career, Barry has been a USSF National Pool Instructor, State Referee Administrator, Grade 5 State Referee, and Regional Administrator. We are pleased that he is able to share his expertise with the referee community this year.


Barry Towbin, USSF National Instructor, FIFA Futrio III USSF Instructor, USYSA Region I Referee Committee member, and Director of New Jersey’s Youth Soccer Referee Education and Development, will present six hours of training to Rhode Island Referees during the Rhode Island PRO Clinic.

Towbin is a highly respected instructor in Region I of US Youth and has presented numerous training venues throughout the eastern portion of the United States. He has also worked with members of the United States Soccer Federation in preparation of training materials for youth referees and advanced referees. A former player and long time referee, Towbin knows the game from both sides of the whistle and his experiences will be shared with the us. Barry is also a member of the New Jersey Youth Soccer Hall of Fame.

 

During the Referee Annual Meeting at the Expo, an election will be held for the position of Member at Large on the State Referee Committee. The Member at Large serves a 2-year term. Interested candidates may declare their candidacy in person at the meeting or in writing prior to the event to secretary@risrc.net. The position is open to anyone age 18 and older; 2013 registered referees age 18 and older are eligible to vote.

9am – Noon RI PRO Clinic / Upgrade Clinic / Grade 8 Recertification

Topics:
Directive Review
Updates and Clarifications
Technical Direction
Points of Emphasis

Noon – 1pm Referee Annual Meeting

1pm – 4pm RI PRO Clinic / Bridge Clinic (9 to 8) / Grade 8 Recertification

Topics:
Pre-Game
Positioning
Break our Group: 11 Commandments of Refereeing

Referees that attend the PRO clinic will receive training credit for 2014 registration.

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Using Psychology In Soccer Officiating

Psychology – “The science that deals with mental processes and behavior.”

By Don Dennison, NISOA National Clinician, Maryland

Using Psychology In Soccer Officiating

I am sure that there was a time in the distant past when all that a referee needed was a solid knowledge of the rule book, a strong whistle and a good pair of legs.  Today’s collegiate referee needs something more; he needs to know what goes on in the players’ minds, he needs to have a knowledge of the tactics of the modern game, he must develop good technique in “people management” and he must know how to deal with what is called gamesmanship.  By having a basic knowledge of psychology as it pertains to the sport, the referee will be better able to deal with the players and coaches and to avoid unnecessary conflicts and confrontations.

Psychology in relation to soccer could easily be the subject of several volumes; this article will deal only with referee relationships with coaches and players and will give you some hints to assist you in people management.
RELATIONSHIP WITH COACHES: At the collegiate level, the salary and the tenure of the coach is often dependent on his/her winning record, so you can be assured that they will do all in their power to influence you if you allow them to do so.

Pregame: Be courteous and pleasant, but don’t overdue the pleasantries.  Never have too long of a discussion with one coach to the exclusion of the other one.  This doesn’t look right and creates an impression of favoritism.  When a coach tells you how glad he/she is to see you, because “most of the other referees during the season didn’t have any knowledge of the offside trap, which we use a lot”, the real intention is to gain your favor.  You might retort “What’s an offside trap?” in jest.
When you meet and greet the coaches, exude confidence and warmth.  First impressions are vital; be friendly but always business-like.

Physical Persona: Good eye contact is important; head up and look the coach in the eye; body posture should include shoulders back and head up, not slouched.  The tone and power of your voice convey a lot about you.  Not all of us are endowed with a radio announcer’s voice, but if possible try to lower your voice pitch and speak slowly, naturally and with authority.  The confidence of your walk creates a good impression if you keep your hands out of your pocket and don’t shuffle.  Of course when you meet the coach, don’t address him by his first name (address him as  “Coach”) and use a firm, but not overpowering handshake.

Always treat the coaches with respect and respond to reasonable inquiries when time permits.  Don’t get yourself involved in lengthy discussions, only answer reasonable questions.  Let your ARs handle coach dissent and any remarks that may be made about the officials if possible.  If they can’t handle this and need you to intercede, get your yellow (or red) card ready and use them.

RELATIONSHIP WITH PLAYERS: Every referee has his own personality.  Some can comfortably chat with players during the match, others should keep their mouths closed.  It is not improper to complement a player who makes a great shot or a goal keeper who  makes a spectacular save.  Everyone, including referees, enjoys a great play.

Control: “CONTROL” is the key word in player management. Don’t be hard-nosed, but let the players know exactly how much you are going to allow in the match.  Set the base line early on and then take appropriate action if the line is passed.
Players should never be threatened (“the next time that you do that, I’m going to show you a Yellow Card”).  Instead, tell the player as you run past him that you saw when he just did and to “knock it off”.  Those are some of the most effective words that you can use.  If the action is repeated, THEN use your cards.  Allow the players to make the decision to behave and stay in the match.
In the event that you have obviously missed a call and are reminded by a player that he was fouled, admit that you may have been looking elsewhere on the field but that you will keep an eye open for a recurrence.  Be HUMAN if you do make a mistake,  admit it and get on with the match.

Stay Calm: When everything else around you is in turmoil, make every effort to speak in a normal, not excited, tone of voice, do not get upset, maintain your composure and stay calm.  You have to be the calming influence on the field.

Showing Red and Yellow Cards: Try to move the offending player away from the crowd.  Have the player take a few steps with you and shoo the rest of the players away.  Don’t ever chase a player around the field, but meet him/her halfway.  Always be firm and do not allow other players to intercede.  Talk personally to the offender and make eye contact.  Tell her in a normal tone of voice what she has done wrong and that any further misconduct will lead to ejection.
Avoid intrusion into the player’s personal space (about 3 feet) and show the card above your own head, not her’s and then record it.  On awarding Red cards, no discussion is needed, just show the card, eject the player and record.  Get the match restarted quickly.  Once action begins, few players will stay around to argue about the call.  This is especially true on penalty kicks.  Note, however, that the Officials must first insure that the ejected player or coach must leave the field and here your Ars or Alternate Official can assist to speed up the process.

KEY STEPS TO PEOPLE MANAGEMENT: Basically, the official’s task is to control people.  To carry out this task efficiently, it is necessary to have some idea of the make-up and psychology of other people, to recognize types and to know what motivates them.  In any confrontation or discussion with either players or coaches:
-Establish eye contact,
-Identify the mood of the individual,
-Establish rapport,
-Convey your message calmly and plainly, and
-Declare completion (get the game going).
KEY POINTS and SUMMARY
You are the one who sets the limits – stay calm – respect players and coaches – be human and above all, maintain control.
Practice the 5 C’s: Care, Compassion, Consideration, Control and Confidence.
The referee needs to be aware of the varied personalities of the participants with which he will be faced during play.  He must recognize symptoms of psychological instability and he must put himself in position where he can exercise a calming or, if needed, a disciplinary influence. Self-confidence in your own abilities is the single most important attribute in applying psychological techniques to soccer officiating.

Source:  Don Dennison, NISOA National Clinician, Maryland

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State Referee and Grade 7 Referee Policy Changes

Effective November 19, 2012, the policy for officials upgrading to the level of State Referee or Grade 7 Referee has been changed.

All candidates for upgrade must declare their intentions by December 31. Candidates will have one year to complete their requirements, and will be upgraded to the next higher grade in the following year.

In addition to meeting the current set of minimum requirements, all upgrade declarations will be reviewed by the SYRA (Grade 7) and SRA (State Referees) for approval to ensure that they are reasonably able to complete the upgrade requirements. There will be an informational meeting in January for declared candidates and the upgrade clinic will be held at the Soccer RI Expo.

Please review the referee grade requirements to ensure that the minimum requirements can be reasonably met within one year prior to starting the upgrade process.

The referee grade requirements can be found online.

In order to declare your intention to complete the upgrade process, please complete and attach your game log with your email to the SYRA (syra@risrc.net) for all grade 8 to 7 upgrades. The game log form with your email should be submitted to the SRA (sra@risrc.net) for all grade 7 to 6 and 6 to 5 upgrades.

A blank game log form can be found here.

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Fall Fitness Test

The final 2013 fitness test will be held on October 28, 2012 at the Warwick Veterans High School track at 2:30 PM. This is the final opportunity to pass a fitness test for 2013 registration or upgrade. Grade 8 referees that are considering upgrading to Grade 7 are encouraged to attend. For any questions, please contact Al Ricci <sdi@risrc.net>

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2012 Summer Cup Academy

The SRC is pleased to announce the second annual Summer Cup Referee Academy. This 3-session event is open to Grade 8 Referees age 15-20 that are looking to improve their game, receive higher level games, or be identified for for premier or regional appointments such as the State Cup, Presidents Cup, Olympic Development Program, and the Regional Youth Championships. Several of Rhode Island’s 2012 regional appointees were identified during the 2011 academy, so this is a great opportunity to learn and be seen.

Referees that participate in the academy will be instructed by some of the state’s top referees, led by USSF Inspector and former National Referee Jack Breetveld. As one of a handful of USSF Inspectors nationwide, Jack regularly assesses National Referees in MLS matches and we are pleased that he is able to share his expertise with the Academy. Rounding out the instructor crew are State Referees Krista McCann and Juan Montalvan, who have both worked extensively at the regional level.

Please see the the Academy Flyer for details about this year’s academy instructors.

All participants will be assigned one paid game in the Ocean State Summer Cup as part of the Academy, either as Referee or Assistant Referee, during one of the three sessions. In addition, participants will receive a Summer Cup Academy shirt. Completion of the Academy program will satisfy your 2013 recertification training requirement.

This year’s Academy will be conducted at the Bend Street Complex in Warwick on July 24, 31, and August 7. Participants must be able to attend all three sessions. The fee for the Academy is $25. Each session runs from 6:15pm to 8:15pm.

The Summer Cup Academy will be limited to 15 participants; registration is online at GameOfficials

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For further information about the academy, please contact Adel Cabral at syra@risrc.net.

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